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The Cantinera Screening in San Antonio Benefits Heidi Search Center

On Thursday, May 12, 2016 Heidi Search Center is presenting a screening of The Cantinera at the Alamo Draft House Cinema Marketplace located at  618 NW Loop 410, San Antonio, TX.  The event will begin at 6pm with the film screening followed by a panel discussion led by Dottie Laster, Executive Director of Heidi Search Center who is featured in the film.

The screening and panel discussion is open to the public and proceeds will benefit Heidi Search Center who is looking for 300 people to commit to a $20 per month recurring donation. For $20 per month the donation will assist in meeting budget needs and enable the center to continue to serve the families of missing persons. A special thank you to Ohlrich Law Firm for their sponsorship of this event.

Seating is limited and tickets need to be purchased in advance at HeidiSearchCenter.Com

i ticket : $20.00 USD – monthly
2 tickets : $35.00 USD – monthly
3 tickets : $50.00 USD – monthly
Recurring Monthly donation
$20.00
$30.00
$50.00

CantineraScreening

The Cantinera captures the essence of trafficking for sex in the gritty bars and hidden back rooms in Houston’s cantinas. It takes viewers into the secret life, along with a group of advocates who fearlessly tread into dangerous situations looking for victims and offering help.

Additionally, the film records the true story of one cantinera who was brought into the life by her mother at 13, how she lived for 23 years drinking 30 beers a night, and how she longs for sobriety and a second chance.

Heidi Search Center prevents human trafficking

heidi search center logoWith the help of Dottie Laster’s expertise in combatting human trafficking, the center has been able to step in and prevent several missing youth from becoming victims of human trafficking by finding them early and returning them to their families along with referrals to specialized resources when needed.

Heidi Search Center has been on the cutting edge providing up to date resources, including the new Digital DNA kit which is devised to immediately conduct searches for individuals who are connecting with others online. The Digital DNA kit is a free download from their website and available to everyone.

Heidi Search Center was established in August, 1990, following the abduction of 11-year-old Heidi Lynn Seeman. She disappeared from her Northeast San Antonio neighborhood on August 4, while walking home from a friend’s house. The non-profit organization provides community resources and aids law enforcement with search efforts, provides advocacy, and referrals.

By providing educational programs, referrals, advocacy, and assisting law enforcement in search efforts for missing children and adults in San Antonio, Texas and beyond, Heidi Search Center continues to work towards their mission.

Heidi Search Center in need of donations

In order to keep the doors open at Heidi Search Center they are in dire need of funding.

Executive Director, Dottie Laster says, “We’ve received generous contributions from individuals for which we are grateful, but we must have a large influx of funds to be able to continue our mission. Our operating expenses have been cut as far as we can go, but the need for services from Heidi Search Center continues to increase.”

If unable to attend the screening, to make a donation please contact Heidi Search Center, 4115 Naco Perrin Blvd., San Antonio, TX, 78217 or call 210-650-0428. Donations can also be made through their website HeidiSearchCenter.Com

Who is Dottie Laster?

Dottie Laster, human trafficking

Dottie Laster

Dottie Laster spent the last 13 years in the effort of the anti-human trafficking movement nationally and in her home state of Texas. She is the co-founder of the San Antonio, Texas Coalition Against Human Trafficking and the past Administrator of the Orange County, California Human Trafficking Task Force and has successfully written millions in grants to assist children and victims of human trafficking.

Along with her position as Executive Director at Heidi Search Center, Laster is the Anti-Trafficking Coordinator with the Bernardo Kohler Center as an accredited representative recognized by the Bureau of Immigration Appeals to practice immigration law under BKC.

Laster is featured in the documentary on sex trafficking in Latin bars and cantinas, The Cantinera, and her direct rescue work is the subject of the MSNBC Documentary, Sex Slaves: Texas Rescue. She is the recipient of several human rights awards and has been featured in numerous publications including recent issues of Texas Monthly, Town Hall, and MORE Magazine.

To bring Dottie Laster to your community or event, please contact ImaginePublicity, Tel: 843-808-0859 or Email: contact@imaginepublicity.com

1 ticket : $20.00 USD – monthly
2 tickets : $35.00 USD – monthly
3 tickets : $50.00 USD – monthly
Recurring Monthly donation
$20.00
$30.00
$50.00

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How to Help Those Who Help Others

help those who help others

It’s the time of year when we think about giving. The Combined Federal Contributions Campaign has been active for Federal employees, mail boxes and inboxes are filling up with letters, catalogues and other forms of pleas for donations and charities.

If you have a business or work for a large corporation your company may have a whole department, or person, dedicated to charitable giving. Businesses gain a large amount of goodwill among their supporters by giving back to the community that benefit from their business.

I come from a background of studying Sociology and International Relations. I started out studying psychology but quickly found that the social context one lives in has a very strong effect on their life.  In order to be most effective in helping others I switched my major to Sociology. I found a world full of answers to complex problems, and more questions than I could imagine to ask, were now in front of me, along with myths that had often been seen as fact.

A civil society

One of the issues that was powerful for me in my studies is the idea of civil society. Civil society is the way that organizations of people fill in the needed gaps between government and business that make a society function properly, or improperly, if those gaps fall unserved. Organizations that are immediately recognized would be the YMCA, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Salvation Army and many more.

There are many societies in the world that do not have a full range of organizations to meet the gaps between business and government. Both business and government can be harsh and leave many needs unmet due to bureaucracy or staying focused on markets.

In the United States, we place a high value on professional services like attorneys, engineers, accountants, sports figures, celebrities and others. We often expect those who serve people to take little to no income. People who educate, rescue lives, and provide social services are often marginalized when it comes to financial compensation.

However, when we have the services needed for families in crisis, it benefits all of society.  The presence of social services restores employees to their jobs, helps children reach their potential, makes neighborhoods safer and guarantees our thriving in the future.

Yet, as I counsel many college students who ask, “How can I do what you do?” I respond, “The best advice I can give you is to do anything else!  You will not be financially rewarded and if you need money to survive, go elsewhere.” What a shame to have to choose between helping others and financial stability.

Example of financial expectations

Christmas party at Heidi Search Center

Christmas party for families of the missing at Heidi Search Center

I was at a meeting years ago with a man who was truly blessed, he and his family owned many businesses in southern California, all extremely successful. He was wonderful to meet with me and let me know he wanted to help with combating human trafficking.

We developed an idea for a fundraiser and raising awareness that trafficking was occurring in his community. After our meeting he said, “This is great and I need your help to make it successful, but I have to work and earn money.”  A few sentences later he said, “… and we will raise all this money, but no salaries will be paid.”

My heart sank. He needed me to feel good, contribute to society, but relieve him so he could earn money. He gave no thought to me not being able to pay my bills or be secure in the process, even though he met me because of my work rescuing victims.

That’s when I realized that our American society does not value the work of social services. It wasn’t his fault, but it’s what we have come to expect.

My personal dream

My dream is that we value human and social services more than we value professional sports teams or the latest celebrity in the news. If people are enslaved, missing, victims of crime, and hungry, then how can we pursue so many other expensive endeavors?

We should solve human suffering as the highest priority, because we are a country built on the idea of compassion, but, we’ve also become a nation of greed. We are a people that puts focus on a problem and we fix it, it’s been proven so many times. The end of World War II, winning the Space Race, finding Bin laden, are examples of human energy put towards a common goal, often framed as good and evil.

Resources for freelance advocates

Why should someone who is combating modern slavery be forced to do so with little to no resources? What could be more evil in modern times than selling others for commercial sex or for forced labor?

We villainized Saddam Hussein for his rape police, but we buy and sell rape in the U.S. as a commodity. Those perpetuating the rape culture and sex trafficking have up to $32 BILLION dollars.

How much could we benefit as a society if the suffering that money caused was stopped?

What if all those people were free and pursuing their full potential and benefitting society?

What if they were never exploited?

What if children were never born into or because of this spectrum of crimes?

What if those children affected by trafficking were protected? Nurtured? Supported?

How much is that worth? Should someone who is experienced and skilled have to work with the risk, but without the benefit of financial resources?

Building a better world for all

If freelance advocates could receive financial compensation similar to an attorney, engineer, or sports figure, the population we serve would benefit and it would allow the freedom needed to find more victims and prevent more exploitation.

I believe we can change the world in a very positive way. I believe we can start a wave of good and create the ability for others to be able to reach their purpose in life. It could be a world with less crying mothers, damaged children; a world with less rapes for money, less murders, less adultery, less STD’s; a world with safer schools and communities for children to grow and thrive.

We need a world where men don’t engage in the barbarous acts of commercial sex.  Men would be able to enjoy women for who they are and not the distorted lies of commercial sex. Men would become the men they should be.

It would be a world safe for victims and hostile to those who exploit them. It would be a world of compassion, where the best and brightest minds were paid to help other people, where material things and fame still existed, but aren’t as important as us as a society loving ourselves!!!

It would be a safer world where everyone has the chance to reach their highest and brightest potential to shine and pursue happiness and joy.

 

Dottie Laster

 

Dottie Laster creates art and jewelry to fund rescue and restoration of human trafficking victimsDottie Laster is the Executive Director of Heidi Search Center in San Antonio, TX and is also affiliated with the Austin, TX non-profit Bernardo Kohler Center where she is accredited to practice immigration law. She heads their Save One Soul outreach.

Laster is featured in the documentary on sex trafficking in Latin bars and cantinas, The Cantinera, and her direct rescue work is the subject of the MSNBC Documentary, Sex Slaves: Texas Rescue. 

She is the recipient of several human rights awards and has been featured in numerous publications including recent issues of Texas Monthly, Town Hall, and MORE Magazine.

She is the CEO of Laster Global Consulting,  has consulted in several high-profile trafficking cases, and has been directly and indirectly responsible for the rescue and restoration of hundreds of trafficking victims. Her strong multi-disciplinary team has an established track record and provide project development, consultancy, and training resources in domestic and international trafficking.

To schedule training in your community and become involved in making your area safe for victims and their families, and hostile to traffickers, contact ImaginePublicity at 843-808-0859 or email contact@imaginepublicity.com

Missing Persons and Human Trafficking

Heidi Search Center logo

I’m so honored to have been selected as the new Executive Director of the Heidi Search Center. I’ve been guided to the field of missing persons by many who work around me and saw the natural fit between my work in the issue of human trafficking and how it relates to missing persons.

I’ve been called to work on several cases in the past that started as missing persons, and of course we found human trafficking to be the reason the people were missing. In some cases, we found the loved one alive and in a couple of cases we found the missing person deceased due to the trafficking activities.

Now, I’m in a new world, discovering the many reasons that people go missing. It could be a flood, due to a rip tide, a runaway, an accident, mental illness, or in one case, a husband who went to Vegas and was arrested; happy he was alive, however not so healthy for his marriage.

I hope this will be a successful venture, finding answers for the families that ask for our help. The statistics for the center show resolution for 94% of the cases that are brought to us. Keeping the center’s good record and the daunting task to keep the success rate at this impressive number is just one of my goals.

From all appearances it looks like the center will have a record number of cases this year. Instead of a decrease, we are experiencing an overwhelming increase in cases coming into the center. Our services are free to the families, and there are no grants to support us.

In the 1990’s when 11-year-old Heidi Seeman went missing, there were thousands of people who stopped what they were doing and looked for her. Heidi was found within weeks murdered, her body located around an hour’s drive from where she went missing.

In 2015, we are finding that many children and adults go missing due to someone they met on the internet. The search has now moved from local to global, and often with little to no way to narrow down the possibilities. Parents are at a disadvantage with a knowledge gap between their kids and the use of technology. The younger generation can make the internet do almost anything they want, however, they do not have the life experience to understand the Pandora’s box they are opening. Parents are doing the right things and controlling devices, however the parents do not know that as soon as the child leaves home that they are connected again at school, their fiends house, and even their grandparent’s home.

I’ve learned to remind adults it’s not if their child is targeted by criminals, but how many times.

I hope we can decrease the need for our services, and I plan to continue to educate parents and children this year, the 25th year of service for Heidi Search Center.  I’m ready for the adventure and I hope you will join us with your support.

Dottie Laster

Dottie Laster

Dottie Laster is also affiliated with the non-profit Bernardo Kohler Center where she is accredited to practice immigration law. She heads their Casita program and Save One Soul outreach.

As a weekly Co-Host on the nationally syndicated radio show, The Roth Show, Laster presents discussion and guests who speak out about a variety of controversial subjects surrounding the abolishment of human trafficking and corresponding crimes.

Dottie Laster is featured in the documentary on sex trafficking in Latin bars and cantinas, The Cantinera, and her direct rescue work is the subject of the MSNBC Documentary, Sex Slaves: Texas Rescue. She is the recipient of several human rights awards and has been featured in numerous publications including recent issues of Texas Monthly, Town Hall, and MORE Magazine.

Dottie Laster is the CEO of Laster Global Consulting which has consulted in several high-profile trafficking cases, and has been directly and indirectly responsible for the rescue and restoration of hundreds of trafficking victims. Her strong multi-disciplinary team has an established track record and provide project development, consultancy, and training resources in domestic and international trafficking.

To schedule trainings in your community and become involved in making your area safe for victims and their families, and hostile to traffickers, contact ImaginePublicity at 843-808-0859 or email contact@imaginepublicity.com

Autism Speaks: Temple Grandin

Temple Grandin

Temple Grandin (photo/Wikipedia)

I was so fortunate to be able to attend a lecture from Temple Grandin. She is an autistic person who has achieved much and overcame obstacles that were turned into assets. She has an HBO movie about her life, she revolutionized the slaughter industry to be more humane and efficient, she also has helped parents and teachers of “different thinkers” to understand the potential and worth of all minds, and she is a Professor in the Department of Animal Science at Colorado State University.

It is not lost on my observations that a person with a disorder that is known for lack of communication, language and social connection has drawn a standing room only crowd, has achieved a PhD, and is about to speak to a very large and eagerly waiting live audience. This shows me, yet again, that absolutely anything is possible.

It takes passion, some luck, and guidance along the way. Many people were instrumental in Grandin’s success, including Grandin. Then I defaulted back to my perspective of human trafficking. What if a rising star, full of potential like Grandin, had been groomed and recruited by traffickers? What would the world have lost and how lucrative would she have been for the traffickers? She would be safe for them because she would be unlikely to speak or be believed, and would probably be very easy to isolate from society.

I shudder and return to reality as she enters the stage.  A large crowd applauds, she is introduced and starts off immediately with a comment that makes everyone laugh. She is jovial, well spoken, and a joy to listen to, I would even say entertaining as she points out the obvious observations that many people miss or might be timid to say aloud. She lists the things that helped her to achieve in her life journey and I realize that she is also listing the things that might help prevent victims from being groomed by traffickers.

Reaching and Teaching Life Lessons

She spoke of her family teaching manners.  Even though she was autistic she was not to scream, throw fits or cause a scene. She talks about one time licking an ice cream cone like a dog, it was taken away and she was told she must eat it correctly. She wanted that ice cream cone so she never forgot that lesson. So simple, yet in the time of the millennials that simple teachable moment might be actually controversial. She also spoke about being engaged. It didn’t matter if she didn’t want to become social, it was expected.

Her example was of a community movie night, she said, “I was expected to attend. The choice was you can run the projector or sit in the audience but you WILL attend.” Again, another moment that might be viewed as old fashioned. I was at an recent event where one child wanted to attend and the other did not. The one that did not was taken by a parent to wait in the car rather than attending. I remembered my grandmother and thought, oh my, she would have not handled it that way, and giggled at the thought. The point is that some of the 50’s era parenting had a lot of value in creating successful adults.

Grandin also spoke about the many jobs she had starting at a young age and how each of them added to her skill set and the experiences are still with her in her career today. She spoke of Millennials not having real work experience, learning to be on time, finishing a job or task, and doing tasks they do not want to do. She was very funny and very on point about the damage caused by bullying, labels, lack of real world experience, and coddling.

Targets of Trafficking

When I default back into my world of human trafficking while thinking about Grandin’s comments about all the kids/adults she sees “on the Spectrum” ( having traits of Asperger’s, Autism or some other different way of processing information) and her worry for where they will wind up again, I shudder. She spoke about all the people on the spectrum in Silicon Valley working at Google, Apple, etc.  I think to cases that I am working on now and she is correct. Many of the victims are “geek” types that have been targeted by traffickers. I think of several cases we are working on and wonder how many more there are that no one knows about.

MSNBC Sex Slaves: Texas RescueWhile filming my episode of MSNBC’s Sex Slaves: Texas Rescue we met one clearly disabled victim being prostituted using her small size to market her as a childlike image for the buyers. She was clearly mentally deficient and could not process the information that we were there to help her, she just couldn’t understand such a concept. We had another case where the victim  was totally brilliant in drawing and design, yet someone was prostituting her. We made three contacts with her and each time she was so excited about design, yet we couldn’t get help to her. On another case a young man who was intellectually brilliant, however, a social outcast at school, was targeted by traffickers and when warning his parents about this his father said, “well, at least he has friends now. We are so happy for him.”

It makes me wonder how right Grandin is and what happens to the “different thinkers.” We all need to become teachers, mentors, and helpers that build their social ties and make them aware of their abilities and worth to society. Because, if we don’t, predators will likely define their worth for them and then traffickers benefit and civil society loses. It matters to all of us.

I am grateful for Grandin’s life journey and all she has to offer. I can see the thousands, if not millions, of people and animals she had affected in positive ways and I wonder who else we have missed because their minds and souls were stolen by traffickers.

It’s up to us, all of civil society, to make our communities safe for victims (and different thinkers) and hostile to traffickers.

Remember Grandin’s quote “Nature is cruel but we don’t have to be.”

To experience Temple Grandin watch the video of her 2010 TED Talk and visit her website TempleGrandin.Com:

 

Dottie Laster, human trafficking

Dottie Laster is affiliated with the non-profit Bernardo Kohler Center where she is accredited to practice immigration law. She created their Save One Soul human trafficking outreach.

As a weekly Co-Host on the nationally syndicated radio show, The Roth Show, Laster presents discussion and guests who speak out about a variety of controversial subjects surrounding the abolishment of human trafficking and corresponding crimes.

Dottie Laster is featured in the documentary on sex trafficking in Latin bars and cantinas, The Cantinera, and her direct rescue work is the subject of the MSNBC Documentary, Sex Slaves: Texas Rescue. She is the recipient of several human rights awards and has been featured in numerous publications including recent issues of Texas Monthly, Town Hall, and MORE Magazine.

Dottie Laster is the CEO of Laster Global Consulting which has consulted in several high-profile trafficking cases, and has been directly and indirectly responsible for the rescue and restoration of hundreds of trafficking victims. Her strong multi-disciplinary team has an established track record and provide project development, consultancy, and training resources in domestic and international trafficking.

To book trainings in your community and become involved in making your area safe for victims and their families, and hostile to traffickers, contact ImaginePublicity at 843-808-0859 or email contact@imaginepublicity.com

Selma (the movie): My Thoughts of Then and Now


I just watched Selma and of course some of the scenes brought tears to my eyes and hurt to my soul.  What was acceptable back then was barbaric.  I was born in 1964, so I have some early memories of the years after Selma and Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination.  I remember my favorite Uncle saying he would vote for George Wallace for president.  Even at a young age, I was shocked that someone I admired so much could see Wallace as the possible leader of our country.

I noticed the treatment of people of color – any color – and even as a child of 5 or 6 years old I knew it was wrong. I often felt the humiliation for black men when watching movies or TV.  I knew then that I would not stand quiet when I was an adult.  I never went against my parent’s authority except when it came to discrimination.

When I was in third grade, I had a birthday party and all the kids in my class were invited except the one that was born of a Vietnamese mother and American father.  I remembered crying and saying that I wanted her to come and I was told “NO”!  So, in third grade I boycotted my own birthday party, I stayed in my room.  I’m sure somehow my parents got me to make an appearance in my small child way.  While I couldn’t make it right, I had at least disrupted the party and not accepted the racism quietly.  I probably received a spanking as well – one which I took gladly.  Today, it sounds terrible even to write it, but in the context of the late 60’s, it was the social norm.

Thoughts on Selma: Then and Now

1965 Civil Rights March from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama

1965 Civil Rights March from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama @Wikipedia

After the movie Selma, I kept thinking about injustice and how it was innate in me to not accept it, how as humans we are wired for justice.  We are harmed when we see injustice, especially when we feel overpowered and helpless watching it.  These thoughts inspired by the movie moved me forward in time to present day.

I kept seeing in my mind the image of a sex trafficking victim (a minor) in leg irons and handcuffs being sentenced to jail, which I witness often.  At many of my speeches, I make the comment that I spend most of my time getting victims out of jail.  I wish I could say this is an exaggeration, but unfortunately, it is true.

When we see horrible injustice, crimes that are too horrible to picture, often a default that our brains use to categorize the unimaginable is to blame the victim.  This is an easy thing to do and is probably a good survival skill for those sensitive to injustice.  It allows the person to move forward and continue their life when faced with something that is too large to combat, repair, or correct.  It may also allow them to feel safer because they can reason that they or their loved ones would not make such a silly mistake.  If we didn’t make that leap in logic, we might be stuck, scared or our lives derailed at many times when we should proceed.  While this is good for the majority of society to proceed with life it is not good for the victims or their loved ones, and it is a constant source of barriers for the advocates.

Then and Now: Case Points

When helping a minor victim of sex trafficking, I was asked by the judge to visit her in juvenile detention. There are words that make people feel better about locking up children like saying detention instead of jail, disposition rather than sentencing.  However the truth is juvenile detention looks, feels and locks like jail.  I’ve been there several times and jumped every time that giant lock opened and closed.

The child victim was brought to me in a room secured with locks, handcuffs and a jailer. Her parents could only see her through the glass window with the phone-no hugging touching or even free conversation.  Each time, I wonder why anyone could think this is civilized, how anyone could buy sex, how these atrocities to justice and a civil society are so accepted?

It is crazy to me now to hear the arguments in the movie Selma, like barriers to voter registration, punishing humans of a different color, stating that human rights were radical, chasing people down in the streets, hitting people and jailing them for peaceful protests because they demanded the existing laws on equality and human rights be respected.

Ignoring the Law

Since 2000, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act states that any minor in commercial sex is a victim of trafficking- no force fraud or coercion need be shown. It also states that victims are not to be punished for acts related to the trafficking.

Arrests in child trafficking  Operation Cross Country II, when 105 children were rescued from forced prostitution in October 2008

Arrests in child trafficking Operation Cross Country II, when 105 children were rescued from forced prostitution in October 2008

In 2015, how barbaric it is to prosecute a child victim of sex trafficking as if he or she were the criminal?   We often criticize other societies for prosecuting rape victims yet here we are prosecuting a child that has been raped many times, not once or twice.  He/she may have been assaulted, witnessed brutal violence, been forced into sex acts that most adults would not be able to imagine much less endure, deprived of sleep, food, and family and now she must be prosecuted?  Chained up, locked up, and if that is not enough, it is done under the pretense of “protecting her”!

I wonder when, as a society, we will be as repulsed by prosecuting sex trafficking victims as we are by racist hatred?  Will it take as long?  This is the 15th year of the TVPA and victims are still being hurt, jailed and killed – they cannot wait (MLK kept telling LBJ in the movie, “people are dying we can’t wait”). There is a fierce urgency – now as then.

In the recent past, in Bexar County, Texas, a buyer of sex was not convicted of killing a prostituted woman because he “paid” for sex with her and she refused. He shot her and remains free under the defense that he was keeping her from “stealing” his property.  Click here to read story. She was being advertised on Craig’s list and her pimp,  calling him her partner, makes it sound like she had an equal stake in the deal.

Under the TVPA:

  • Anyone benefitting is held responsible the same as all parties.
  • If someone dies due to the trafficking, it becomes a capital crime punishable by up to life in prison and possibly the death penalty – the important word here is “dies” not murdered.

She lingered for 7 months paralyzed after being shot in the neck on Christmas Eve of 2009.  Much like the atrocities of the juries mentioned in Selma, this jury ruled for the defendant on his right to protect his property, the $150 he used to buy her for commercial sex.

In 1964, there were laws in place, the laws just were not being respected, very much the same as the Trafficking Victims Protection Act is ignored today.

How can we make communities safe for victims and hostile to traffickers?

This year we will blog and speak about real things that amazing individuals and organizations are doing that are truly making a difference. I hope you will follow, join, support and share this work so that we, together, can truly change the world and make many safe havens for trafficked victims.

Maybe one day a victim of human trafficking could even become President!

Dottie Laster

Dottie Laster

Dottie Laster is affiliated with the non-profit Bernardo Kohler Center where she is accredited to practice immigration law. She created their Casita program and Save One Soul outreach.

As a weekly Co-Host on the nationally syndicated radio show, The Roth Show, Laster presents discussion and guests who speak out about a variety of controversial subjects surrounding the abolishment of human trafficking and corresponding crimes.

Dottie Laster is featured in the documentary on sex trafficking in Latin bars and cantinas, The Cantinera, and her direct rescue work is the subject of the MSNBC Documentary, Sex Slaves: Texas Rescue. She is the recipient of several human rights awards and has been featured in numerous publications including recent issues of Texas Monthly, Town Hall, and MORE Magazine.

Dottie Laster is the CEO of Laster Global Consulting which has consulted in several high-profile trafficking cases, and has been directly and indirectly responsible for the rescue and restoration of hundreds of trafficking victims. Her strong multi-disciplinary team has an established track record and provide project development, consultancy, and training resources in domestic and international trafficking.

To book trainings in your community and become involved in making your area safe for victims and their families, and hostile to traffickers, contact ImaginePublicity at 843-808-0859 or email contact@imaginepublicity.com

Selma (the movie): My Thoughts of Then and Now